Shelton's Pool and Spa Logo

Ken Shelton
714-800-9988

CA Contractors Lic # 950499
Member of the United Pool
Association, Route Chairman

Service Areas:
Huntington Beach, Seal Beach, Sunset Beach,
Newport Beach, Westminster, Costa Mesa, and Fountain Valley

Waterline

Pool and Spa Safety

General Safety Tips

  • Know your swimming limits and stay within them. Don't try to keep up with a stronger skilled swimmer or encourage others to keep up with you. Keep an eye on weaker swimmersif they appear tired, encourage them to get out of the water and rest.
  • Watch out for the "dangerous too's"too tired, too cold, too much sun, too much strenuous activity. Get out of the water immediately if any of these situations occur.
  • Stay off the main drain. The suction from the pump could trap you underwater. Learn more about pump suction and safety.
  • Use common sense regarding food and beverages while swimming.
  • Do not chew gum or eat while you swim; you could easily choke.
  • Never drink alcohol and swim.
  • Use common sense about swimming after eating. If you have had a large meal, it is wise to let digestion get started before doing strenuous activity such as swimming.
  • Use plastic instead of glassware in the pool area.
  • Obey "No Diving" signs. A general rule is to enter feet first into water than head-first.
  • Never dive into an aboveground pool. They are too shallow.
  • Make sure the pool cover is completely lifted off the pool. Never walk on the pool cover.
  • Watch the weather: Know local weather conditions and prepare for electrical storms. Because water conducts electricity, stop swimming as soon as you see or hear a storm.
  • Keep rescue equipment ( pole, rope and personal floatation devices) by the pool.
  • Keep a phone poolside. Program the phone with emergency phone numbers and/or post emergency phone numbers in your pool area.
  • Learn cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and basic first aid. Post CPR instructions in your pool area.

Special Precautions for Children

  • ALWAYS supervise children when they are in or around your pool or any water environment (stream, bath tub, toilet, bucket of water), no matter what skills your child has acquired and no matter how shallow the water.
  • Install physical barriers around your pool and spa to prevent access by young children.
  • Fences should be at least four feet high with self-closing, self-latching gates, which are kept in good working order. Dont leave any furniture near the fence so that a child could climb over into the pool area.
  • If your house forms one side of the barrier to the pool, then doors leading from the house to the pool should be equipped with alarms that sound when the doors are unexpectedly opened.
  • For additional protection, use a power safety cover (a motor-powered barrier placed over the water area).
  • For aboveground pools, steps and ladders to the pool should be secured or removed when the pool is not in use.
  • Keep children off the main drain. The suction from the pump could trap them underwater. Learn more about pump suction and safety.
  • Don't leave toys in the water. Toys can lure a child into the pool.
  • Enroll your children in a water safety course and/or swimming classes.
  • Never use flotation devices or inflatable toys to replace parental supervision.
  • Do not use air-filled swimming aids as a substitute for approved life vests.
  • Do not allow children to eat or chew gum while in the water to prevent choking.
  • Parents and anyone supervising children should know cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and basic first aid. Post CPR instructions in your pool area.
  • Don't assume young children will use good judgment and caution around the water. Children must be constantly reminded to walk slowly in the pool area and only to enter the water with you.
  • Watch the weather: Know local weather conditions and prepare for electrical storms. Because water conducts electricity, stop swimming as soon as you see or hear a storm.
  • After you are done swimming, secure the pool so children cant enter.
  • Know your swimming limits and stay within them. Don't try to keep up with a stronger skilled swimmer or encourage others to keep up with you. Keep an eye on weaker swimmersif they appear tired, encourage them to get out of the water and rest.

IN CASE OF EMERGENCY, remember to CHECKCALLCARE

  • CHECK the injured person
  • CALL 9-1-1 or your local emergency number
  • CARE for the person until help arrives

Stay off the main drain!

Your circulating pump creates a strong vacuum at the main drain at the bottom of your pool. In fact the suction is so strong, it can trap adults or children underwater.

We recommend removal of the automatic pool cleaner when swimming.
Read the cleaner or vacuum owners manual for safe operating information.

Make sure your pool or spa has the following:

  • An emergency shut-off switch for the pool circulation pump and the spa jet pump in an easily accessible, obvious place near the pool or spa. Make sure bathers know where it is, and how to use it in case of emergency.
  • At least two suction outlets from the pool to the main circulating pump.
  • Either one of these outlets should be able to supply the pump by itself without exceeding the flow rating of its cover. (Many aboveground pools use the skimmer as the suction outlet, and have no main drain; these pools dont require a second suction outlet.)
  • Each outlet must have a cover fastened down with screws, be designed so that they wont trap body parts or hair, and be certified by a nationally recognized testing laboratory. Plastic deck and drain covers may deteriorate, and crack or break from exposure to sunlight or weather. Routinely replace them every 3-4 years.